event 24 mai 2022 time 09:30 EDT

Seminar // Irrigation Investment Policy: Does Scale Matter?

Co-organized by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and IFPRI this seminar is part of AGRILINKS mechanization and irrigation month. The role of policy and size of irrigation in supporting the poorest food producers and consumers in these challenging times and more will be discussed.

category Seminars tag Climate change tag Adaptation tag Food and Agriculture tag SPIS (Solar-powered-Irrigation) tag Irrigation tag Governance (of the Nexus) tag Policy tag Capacity Building
Logo

May 24, 2022 I 9:30 - 11:30 AM EDT

About the event

Irrigation has contributed to increased food production, lower food prices, higher rural employment, and overall agricultural and economic growth. It has been a key component of agricultural intensification and transformation in Asia and has the potential to take on the same role in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, despite some evidence that large scale irrigation schemes are less inclusive, sustainable, profitable, and environmentally friendly, investment in large-scale irrigation has increased following the 2007/09 Food Price Crisis and is expected to further grow as climate change impacts make rainfed agriculture less and less viable and food self-sufficiency strategies grow in importance. Similarly, despite criticism that small-scale irrigation is not scaling nor climate resilient without subsidies and the lack of an enabling environment, such as improved market access, there are ongoing projects.

Regardless of size, the future of irrigation cannot repeat the past: Climate change, rapidly growing non-irrigation demands on water resources, the Ukraine crisis, and the need for much-improved environmental sustainability demand that the environmental footprint of irrigation is reduced. At the same time, irrigated areas and development will need to grow—to allow farmers to navigate highly uncertain climate realities and ensure food production growth, including of costlier, nutrient-dense crops. The irrigation of the future will also need to be more knowledge intensive and should provide better incentive structures that support the world’s key water stewards—farmers. Mutual accountability, inclusivity (such as by ensuring that women farmers benefit equally through proactive policies), and transparency related to irrigation policy are also critical themes that may influence the success of irrigation schemes.

Given the recent confluence of several crises—Climate extreme events, Covid-19, and Conflicts and wars—a policy seminar co-organized by USAID and the International Food Policy Research Institute will discuss the role of policy and size of irrigation in supporting the poorest food producers and consumers in these challenging times. Specific areas of focus, in line with the US Government’s Global Food Security Strategy and Global Water Strategy, include the sector’s role in: 1) promoting inclusive, sustainable agriculture-led economic growth, 2) building resilience among vulnerable populations and households; 3) strengthening food security and nutrition; 4) protecting freshwater resources; and 5) developing supporting institutions.

This seminar is part of the AGRILINKS mechanization and irrigation month.

Organizers

This event is Co-organized by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and IFPRI

Registration

No registration is needed. Watch online at IFPRI's event page.

Further Information

Visit the event website for addtitional information.

Contact

Cecilia Vey

Bulletin d'information

Restez informé!

Nous vous informons sur les projets, les évènements, les actions, les publications et les nouvelles en cours !