Nexus in the Media // Archive 2017

Media

UN NewsCentre // UN agriculture chief calls for stronger water management, improved access for small farmers

The head of the United Nations agricultural agency today urged the international community to promote more efficient use of water and to take steps to secure water access, especially for poor family farmers.

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State of the Green // Ensuring Energy, Food, and Water for All

According to DTU International Energy Report 2016, new approaches and collaborations across sectors are necessary if we wish to meet the increasing demand for global energy- water and food production.

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ET EnergyWorld // Scientists developing solar-powered system to provide safe drinking water in India

Scientists are developing a low-cost, solar-powered water purification system that may help over 77 million people in remote parts of India get access to safe drinking water.

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Desalination // Next Big Thing: Renewable Water Desalination

By Zachary Shahan. Wind is now a mature market that offers the cheapest electricity in the power generation industry. Solar arrived right behind it and might also be labeled as mature now. Electric vehicles and batteries are going through puberty, nearing mass-market maturity. Autonomous vehicles, which look set to bring us electric robotaxis, are just budding. What’s next?

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Water Technology // Solar-powered water recycling’s benefits in food and beverage processing

By Vincent Paolucci and Al Colanero. Changing to solar power and implementing water recycling systems provide effective ways for companies in the food and beverage industry to reduce operating costs and increase cash flow, while becoming energy efficient and environmentally responsible. In particular, manufacturers and distributors of food and beverage products that occupy commercial buildings, especially buildings with large rooftops, can benefit from the installation of solar panels.

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MIT News // How engineering students are seeking to solve major food and water security problems

By Carolyn Schmitt. Food and water are two necessities for survival, but what happens when a changing climate in key agricultural regions threatens crop production? Or when the quality of milk cannot be ensured as it is exchanged between producer and seller? Seven MIT graduate students studying food and water security issues presented their research and preliminary findings on issues such as these during the MIT Water and Food Security Student Symposium held on Nov. 21. Hosted by the MIT...

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The Express // Government reviews potential for water energy

If the independent review, conducted by former UK energy minister Charles Hendry, backs the technology, it could provide a boost to a “world first” project to harness the power of the tides in the Severn Estuary. The assessment, commissioned last year amid negotiations on the project, has looked into whether the lagoons represent value for money and how they could contribute to the UK's energy mix in the most effective way.

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The Guardian // Water-energy-food: can leaders at Davos solve this global conundrum?

By Dominic Waughray. Huge demands for water present complicated challenges, but leaders will not resolve these kinds of interconnected risks without a systems approach.

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The Free Press Journal // Integrated sustainable solutions required to solve water crisis

Industrialists, scientists, spiritual leaders and noted experts in the field of water conservancy have stressed the need to bring about integrated sustainable solutions to solve water crisis besides creating awareness among the people about holistic solution to greener environment. Speakers at a one-day conference, organised by Govardhan Eco Village of ISKCON and Artha Forum, also focused on building up community initiatives to conserve water bodies and achieve working solutions for a...

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National Geographic // As Groundwater Dwindles, a Global Food Shock Looms

By Cheryl Katz. By mid-century, says a new study, some of the biggest grain-producing regions could run dry.

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