Research Papers, Publications and Books

River Management // Sensitivity of Regulated Flow Regimes to Climate Change in the Western United States

By Tian Zhou, Nathalie Voisin, Guoyong Lenga, Maoyi Huang, and Ian Kraucunas. Water management activities modify water fluxes at the land surface and affect water resources in space and time. Conventional understanding on the role of water management suggests that regulated river flow would be less sensitive to future climate conditions than natural flow in terms of the absolute changes in mean monthly flows. In this study the authors evaluate such an assumption by redefining sensitivity as the difference in the emergence of changes in cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of future regulated and natural flows in response to climate change with respect to their respective historical regulated and natural flow conditions. The results could inform integrated assessment studies when designing adaptation strategies in the water–energy–food nexus.

The emergence of changes (shift in CDFs) in natural and regulated river flow regimes across the western United States from simulations driven by multiple climate models and scenarios were compared. Forty percent of Hydrologic Unit Codes 4 (HUC4s) over the western United States might perceive such a shift in seasonal regulated flow earlier than they would have seen in natural flow conditions, although the absolute change is smaller than that under natural conditions. About 10% of the regulated HUC4s see a delay and are therefore less sensitive to climate change. In the spring (MAM), the overall sensitivity tends to decrease as the level of river regulation increases, as expected. However, in the winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) seasons, the sensitivity tends to increase with increasing levels of regulation, with changes in smaller magnitudes than under natural conditions.

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American Meteorological Society AMS website

Published

2017

In

J. Hydrometeor., 19, 499–515, doi:10.1175/JHM-D-17-0095.1

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Research Papers, Publications and Books

Nexusing Charcoal in South Mozambique // A Proposal To Integrate the Nexus Charcoal-Food-Water Analysis With a Participatory Analytical and Systemic Tool

By: Ricardo Martins. Nexus analysis identifies and explores the synergies and trade-offs between energy, food and water systems, considered as interdependent systems interacting with contextual drivers (e.g., climate change, poverty). The nexus is thus a valuable analytical and policy design supporting tool to address the widely discussed links between bioenergy, food and water. In fact, the Nexus provides a more integrative and broad approach in relation to the single isolated system approach...

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Podcasts and audio recordings

Resultados del Diálogo Regional LAC // Sesión 10: “Conclusiones y Recomendaciones”

Esta sesión de clausura resume los resultados del diálogo y formula recomendaciones para la aplicación del enfoque Nexus en la región de América Latina y el Caribe. Descargue aquí las presentaciones y grabaciones de audio de la sesión 10 del Diálogo Regional Político-Técnico sobre “El Nexo entre el Agua, la Energía y la Alimentación”, que se celebró en la sede de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL) en Santiago de Chile, los días 14 y 15 de mayo de 2018.

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Podcasts and audio recordings

Resultados del Diálogo Regional LAC // Sesión 9: “Nexo Agua-Energía-Alimentación: Planes y Demandas Nacionales”

¿Qué tipo de apoyo necesitan los países de América Latina y el Caribe para implementar el enfoque Nexus? ¿Qué proyectos Nexus les pueden identificar e implantar? Descargue aquí las presentaciones y grabaciones de audio de la sesión 9 del Diálogo Regional Político-Técnico sobre “El Nexo entre el Agua, la Energía y la Alimentación”, que se celebró en la sede de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL) en Santiago de Chile, los días 14 y 15 de mayo de 2018.

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