Thirsty Food Story: Grasping the Invisible Ingredient
{http://www.shutterstock.com/de/pic-171576404/stock-photo-cows-eating-green-grass-indoor.html|Shutterstock/RomanKorytov}
News

Water-Food Nexus // Thirsty Food Story: Grasping the Invisible Ingredient

Every food item we eat needs water for its production, but different foods require different amount of water. What do you think consumes more water: a steak, a glass of milk, a piece of bread or a cucumber? The short answer to this question is that the steak is the biggest water consumer. - by Ylva Ran

However, this answer is not enough, it is much more complex than it seems and requires that we understand more of the complexity behind water use in agricultural production. Regardless of whether you think livestock products is a key ingredient of your every meal or not, it is an important part of human diets globally, especially in low-income countries. 1 billion people in these countries depend on livestock, and it has a significant value for battling malnutrition in many places around the world.

It has already been well established that large scale livestock production systems are very land and water demanding, they are large emitters of methane gas and, when managed badly, pose a threat to water quality and biodiversity. Meanwhile, consumption of livestock products is continuously increasing and the production is expected to double by 2050.

#box:addon

<<fotos/2013-14/people/ylva-ran.jpg|c|Ylva Ran>>

Ylva Ran

joined SEI Stockholm in 2013. She holds a B.Sc. in environmental sciences from Gothenburg University and an M.Sc. in Ecosystems, resilience and governance from the Stockholm Resilience Centre. Her recent work has focused on water resources and environmental impact of livestock production focusing on both global and local impact assessments.

This blog has originally been published on the website {http://dialogues.cgiar.org/blog/thirsty-food-story-grasping-the-invisible-ingredient/|CGIAR Development Dialogues 2014} and is reposted here with kind permission by the author. It was based on a blogpost for the {www.siani.se|Swedish International Agriculture Network Initiative (SIANI)}.

#box

Over-consumption of animal-sourced products has been linked to cardiovascular diseases, cancer and high blood pressure. It's likely that reduced intake of livestock products could result in lower environmental impact and better health for some people. However, stopping consumption of animal sourced products is not the solution to environmental and health problems linked to its consumption.

Eating steak, cheese or having milk with your cereal is a personal choice and it should remain so. The question is; can resources across livestock supply chains be managed more effectively? Should we feed grains suitable for human food to animals? Can we make a better use of animal's ability to produce nutrient rich food from non-edible grasses, plant residues and waste?

Is sustainable livestock production possible? I believe that we have to aim at providing measures and techniques capable of showing clear and real information regarding livestock production, linking up to ecosystem functions and abandoning general quantifications with no spatial connection.

Originating from rainfall, water at the land surface is divided either into run-off, reaching water bodies, or into soil moisture. Generally, livestock production systems allocate over 98% of required water to production of animal feed, both as rain-fed and as irrigation for crops and pasture. The remaining 2% is used for other purposes, such as drinking.

A number of methods have already been developed to quantify the water demand for livestock. The results from these calculations indicate that many livestock production systems demand huge amounts of water. However, these numbers are very general and do not reflect local context or which type of water is used for production.

Why is that? Firstly, animals can produce edible food from non-edible biomass; for example a cow that produces milk by eating grass. The water used in the production of grass is still calculated as being consumed in the production of the milk. Even if a cow did not eat the grass, the water would still be consumed for its production. So how do we deal with the "cost" of such water?

Water resource use does not have global impacts like carbon. Water consumption in a water scarce area may have profound effects in that specific location, but that means nothing elsewhere where water is available.

The way water is used matters. Some production systems consume water for irrigation, for example in grain-fed intensive cattle or poultry production. However, as in the case of Uruguayan beef, the most intensive systems require the least amount of water compared to production systems with cows grazing entirely on natural grasslands that are largely water demanding. Without analyzing how irrigation practices are depleting local water bodies, quantification of water demand in both systems will not make it clear which one of them uses water resources more sustainably.

Together with colleagues from the Stockholm Environment Institute, Wageningen University, ILRI and CSIRO I am currently working on a methodology that takes into account the potential of the water resources used for livestock. The method captures if there is an alternative use, for example to cultivate crops instead of animal feed that would be more suitable at a given location.

In the end, we are hoping to provide livestock producers and policy makers with a method that would deliver a picture of livestock water use in its complexity. This way we would be able to make informed choices of resource use and establish a path to sustainable livestock management.

› back

Climate Change

Nexus Blog // Understanding the Water-Energy-Food Nexus in a warming Climate

In this article, the authors explore what the WEF Nexus is, how to minimize trade-offs and maximise co-benefits within it, and what opportunities it offers to address the challenges of a changing climate. They further draw on ongoing research in Tanzania’s Rufiji River Basin – a case that exemplifies key issues in the WEF nexus – where ambitious development plans cut across several sectors and could be severely limited by future climate change.

// more
Dresden Nexus Conference DNC2020

Call for Abstracts // Dresden Nexus Conference 2020

The call for abstracts for the upcoming Dresden Nexus Conference 2020 is now open! The Dresden Nexus Conference is an international conference series dedicated to advancing research on and the implementation of a Nexus Approach to environmental resource management and to fostering dialogue on how nexus thinking contributes to achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

// more
Research

Call for Nexus Research Proposals // Call with South Africa on Water-Energy-Food Nexus

This call marks the start of a new cooperation programme with the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) and falls under the Merian Fund. The programme aims to further stimulate joint, impact-oriented research between Dutch and South African researchers. The first call for proposals focuses on the WEF nexus within major societal challenges. The deadline for submission is 26 September 2019.

// more