Towards a green economy - the water-food-energy nexus
Event

Workshop at the World Water Week Stockholm // Towards a green economy - the water-food-energy nexus

This Workshop will address a series of innovative frameworks that help analyse technical solutions as well as trade-offs in the water-food-energy nexus for better informed decision-making.

The workshop will also exemplify solutions to maximize synergies, towards a 'green food security', and to enable policy and institutional changes required to better address the social, economic and environmental dimensions the green economy through a "nexus" approach.

Achieving water security and food security for all in an increasingly water stressed world is intimately linked to energy security. While food demand may increase by up to 70 per cent by 2050, the global demand for energy may increase by up to 40 per cent. Agriculture accounts for some 70 per cent of the world's freshwater withdrawals for food, feed and fibre, as well as for production of bio-fuels. Energy production in some parts of the world accounts for up to 45 per cent of all water withdrawals. Satisfying these demands, while maintaining ecosystems, livelihoods, fisheries and biodiversity, is a challenge. While energy production carries a heavy water bill, a significant energy bill is associated with pumping, treatment and desalination of water. The "footprints" work both ways. Hence water, food and energy security need to be addressed an in integrated way, in the context of a pro-poor green economy valuing ecosystem services, as a "nexus" with water at the heart.

This Workshop will address a series of innovative frameworks that help analyse technical solutions as well as trade-offs in the water-food-energy nexus for better informed decision-making. It will also exemplify solutions to maximize synergies, towards a 'green food security', and to enable policy and institutional changes required to better address the social, economic and environmental dimensions the green economy through a "nexus" approach.

Chairs and moderators

-Dr. Fritz Holzwarth, BMU

-Prof. Johan Kuylenstierna, SEI

-Mr. Jeremy Bird, International Consultant

Rapporteurs

-Dr. Alain Vidal, CPWF

-Prof. Torkil Jønch Clausen, SIWI

-Ms. Kristine Donnelly, Pacific Institute

Keynote speakers

-Dr. Jane Madgwick, WI

-Prof. Joachim von Braun, ZEF

-Mr. Joppe Cramwinckel, WBCSD

-Prof. Johan Rockström, SRC

Panellists

-Dr. Letitia Obeng, GWP

-Mr. Bai-Mass Taal, AMCOW

-Mr. Hans Guttman, Mekong River Commission Secretariat

-Mr. Alex McPhail, WB

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