"The Water-Energy Nexus - Innovation and Opportunity now", Cambridge/Mass., USA
Event

Energy Circle Seminar // "The Water-Energy Nexus - Innovation and Opportunity now", Cambridge/Mass., USA

Discussing: Where will the water innovation come from to meet the needs of the energy, industrial and agricultural sectors? What are the global trends and what can we learn? What are companies–and people — doing locally to address this issue? Is it time to develop regional a water/energy ecosystem? Benefits? How can we best leverage our substantial regional technology ecosystem to address the needs of the growing water/energy nexus? What role does desalination and membrane technology play? Currently 59% of the growth (Global Water Intelligence) is from membrane technology

 

Where

UK Trade & Investment

One Broadway, 7th Floor

Cambridge, MA 02139

USA

About

Only.5% of the world's water is fresh and accessible and there is increased competition for water from increased energy and food demands. Moreover, it takes a great deal of energy to produce the water needed both for drinking and for industrial uses including food production, manufacturing and energy. The nexus between water and energy is clear: water is critical for producing energy and you can't produce water without energy.

Consider that:

-Our globally expanding middle class, worldwide population increase, and economic growth are creating increased demands on energy and food production. For example, it is projected that food production will increase by almost 100% to meet population demand by 2030 (World Economic Forum).

-Traditional energy generation require significant volumes of water to produce a KW of energy. Matter of fact, nuclear energy requires about 620 times the amount of water to produce 1 KWH than wind power. (Paul Gipe, 'Wind Comes of Age")

-The global water industry is a about $500B annually — our region with its numerous entrepreneurs, companies and universities offers one of the most robust ecosystems to tap into this growing industry.

Moderator:

-Will Sarni, Director and Practice Leader, Enterprise Water Strategy | Sustainability and Climate Change, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Panel:

-David Goodtree, Co-Organizer Symposium on Water Innovation in Massachusetts, and Co-Chair, Massachusetts Water Innovation Mission to Israel

-Jim Matheson, Chief Executive Officer, Oasys Water

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