Resource Revolution: The Energy/Water Nexus in Oil & Gas
Event

Conference // Resource Revolution: The Energy/Water Nexus in Oil & Gas

The dynamic transformation of the global oil and gas sectors continues to present unprecedented opportunities - and significant challenges. Within its lifetime, an unconventional well may use up to 13 million gallons of water and, while this was once a drop in the ocean in comparison to North America's abundant freshwater sources, today, it's crippling.

 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29

8:15 a.m. — 9:00 a.m. Registration and Breakfast

9:00 a.m. — 9:10 a.m. Welcome

Heiner Markhoff, GE Power & Water, Water & Process Technologies

9:10 a.m. — 9:30 a.m. Opening Keynote

9:30 a.m. — 10:30 a.m. Panel Session:

Power, Promise and Peril: Policy and Regulation in Oil & Gas

50 minutes moderated panel discussion; 10 minutes audience Q&A

With shifting global supply, energy innovations and emerging technologies, large financial implications and market fluctuations, and the rising influence of geo-political issues, oil and gas companies must remain committed to being at the forefront of innovation in exploration and production. This commitment, however, depends largely on water — and industry-friendly policy and legislation and other government-regulated rules from the U.S. and abroad. How can industry and government work together to advance the potential of our water/energy future?

Sarah Light, Wharton School

 

10:30 a.m. — 10:40 a.m. BREAK

10:40 a.m. — 11:40 a.m. Panel Session:

Accelerating and Sustaining the Water/Energy Ecosystem through Innovation

50 minutes moderated panel discussion; 10 minutes audience Q&A

More than ever, water is inextricably linked to the future of energy. The oil and gas industry continues to explore unconventional sources, requiring and pushing the technological limits of breakthrough water treatment solutions. Together, leveraging social and human capital, the sectors are paving the way to solving energy issues in the 21st century through technology.

Panelist: Tom Stanley, GE Power & Water, Water & Process Technologies

Panelist: Cal Cooper, Apache Energy

Panelist: From MWH Global

 

11:40 a.m. — 11:45 a.m. BREAK

11:45 a.m. — 12:30 p.m. Closing Keynote / Q&A Session

Jeff Lape, Deputy Director, Office of Science & Technology, EPA

12:30 p.m. — 2:00 p.m. NETWORKING LUNCHEON

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