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Innovative Water Management

01 Mar 12

Contributing Towards Solving Three Major Economical Growth Challenges in Jordan

by Ministry of Water and Irrigation (Jordan)

Jordan is classified as one of the most water scarce countries in the world with less than 140 m3 per capita and year. Moreover, the fact that 97% of its energy is imported constitutes a major challenge to economical growth in Jordan. The share of agriculture in the GDP does not exceed 5%, whereas the sector consumes 58% of the available renewable water resources.

The Jordan Water Sector Strategy indicates the necessity for maximizing the efficiency of resource allocation by reusing quality treated wastewater, while freeing the fresh water for domestic use. German Jordanian Cooperation resulted in designing a project facing these three challenges. It includes the collection of treated wastewater from three large wastewater treatment plants in the north of Jordan, conveying about 17-35 million cubic meter (MCM) downwards to the Jordan Valley (Jordan food basket) from 2013 to 2035 and injecting it in the irrigation system for irrigating citrus, banana, vegetables, and other crops. This relieves pressure on the same quantity of fresh water which can be used for drinking.

While conveying the treated wastewater from 600 m above sea level to 300 m below sea level, the piped flow will generate clean hydro-power serving up to 15,000 households. The three outcomes will generate an internal rate of return of about 14%.

  • Raja Ammari, Director of Management Contracts, Performance Management Unit (PMU), Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Jordan

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Contributing Towards Solving Three Major Economical Growth Challenges in Jordan

by Ministry of Water and Irrigation (Jordan)

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